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  #11  
Old 08-08-2008, 11:27 PM
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Gozzhawk Gozzhawk is offline
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

c'mon mansarse, past your bedtime.

thanks rtnut.

It is interestinG, next question .......... Whats better a Goldie or an AK. Only jokinG.

Thanks for replies so quick folks.
G

Last edited by Gozzhawk; 08-08-2008 at 11:28 PM. Reason: spelling
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2008, 11:29 PM
SharpTail SharpTail is offline
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

My guess is that most states would make you take the exam, at a game dept office. verifiable experience might get you moved beyond the apprentice stage. Facilities inspection is likely.

The thing to remember is that the federal falconry laws are being revamped currently. The Wild Raptor Take Conservency, a new national falconry club has challanged a few major tennants of old law and there may be some big changes, such as in inspections(unwarrented search). After the new regs are out each state will need to revamp its own system.

Here is what the Conservency is suggesting for states:


Falconry license classes and requirements.

a) Apprentice class.
1. An applicant for an apprentice class falconry license shall be at least 12 years of age.
2. A license shall not be issued to an applicant for apprentice class unless the applicant passes an examination and the applicant’s facilities and equipment have been inspected and certified by the department or a department representative, such as a department-designated master falconer, as meeting minimum standards.
3. An apprentice falconer shall be instructed by a sponsor during the first two years the apprentice class falconry license is in effect, and each apprentice falconer shall notify the department within 30 days of any change in sponsorship.
4. An apprentice falconer shall possess no more than one raptor at a time and. shall not take more than two raptors from the wild during the one year period from Jan. 1st through Dec. 31st.
5. An apprentice falconer and his or her sponsor shall determine which raptors are best suited for the apprentice falconer.
b) General class.
1. An applicant for a general class falconry license shall be at least 16 years of age.
2. Each applicant for a general class falconry license shall have been licensed for at least two years at the apprentice class level.
3. A general falconer shall possess no more than three raptors and shall not take more than two raptors from the wild during the one year period from Jan1st through Dec. 31st.
c) Master class.
1. An applicant for a master class falconry license shall have at least five years of licensed or equivalent experience at the general class level
2. Raptors possessed and taken by a master class falconer will be consistent with the pending federal requirements..
d) Sponsors.
1. Each sponsor of an apprentice falconer shall hold a master or general class license and shall have at least 5 years licensed experience in the sport of falconry.
2. A sponsor may supervise no more than three apprentice class falconers at any one time.
3. If a sponsor of an apprentice falconer withdraws sponsorship, the sponsor shall notify the apprentice falconer immediately upon withdrawing sponsorship and shall notify the department in writing within 30 days of withdrawing sponsorship.

Examination.

Each applicant for a new apprentice, general, or master falconry license shall have successfully passed an examination administered by the fish & game department prior to receiving his or her license.
a) The examination shall cover topics including basic biology, disease & treatment, training, care & handling of raptors, literature, law, regulations, and other appropriate subject matter relating to falconry and raptors.
b) A score of 80 percent shall be required as a minimum passing score.
c) Each applicant failing the examination may retake it after a period of 30 days.
d) Any applicant holding a valid falconry license from another state shall not be required to take an examination when applying for a similar falconry license in this state.

Facilities.

a) All licensed falconers shall maintain housing facilities which adequately protect each possessed raptor from predators, excessive sun and wind and inclement weather.
1. If a mews is used, the licensee shall assure that:
A) each chamber is large enough to allow easy access for the caring of raptors housed therein;
B) windows, if present, are covered on the inside by vertical bars, spaced at intervals narrower than the width of the raptor’s body;
C) floors permit easy cleaning and are well drained; and
D) Perches are provided.
2. If an outdoor weathering area is used, the applicant shall assure that:
A) the area is large enough to permit the raptor to bate without striking the enclosure walls or ceiling; and
B) At least one perch per raptor is provided.

Equipment.

a) Each applicant shall possess the following equipment prior to receiving a license:
1. at least one pair of alymeri or similar type jesses to be used when raptors are free flown;
2. at least one leash and one strong swivel;
3. at least one bath container for each raptor that is at least two to six inches deep and wider than the length of the raptor; and
4. a scale or balance graduated to increments of not more than ˝ ounce (15 grams) that is suitable for weighing raptors.

Acquisition of raptors.
a) Every falconer obtaining a raptor shall possess a falconry license.
b) Eyasses may be taken only by general and master falconers.
c) Passagers of any allowable raptor species may be taken from the wild or otherwise obtained by apprentice, general, and master falconers.
d) Haggards of the following species of raptors may be taken from the wild or otherwise obtained , by apprentice, general, and master falconers:
1. American Kestrel (Falco sparverius); and
2. Great-horned Owl (Bubo virginianus).
e) At least one eyass shall be left in the nest when an eyass is taken.
f) The seasons for raptor take will be consistent with federal requirements.
g) Raptor species listed by the state as endangered shall not be taken from the wild within the state unless authorized.
h) The state may authorize a take within the state, of one raptor per year of a species listed by the state as threatened, providing the take is by a master falconer.
i) Nothing shall prohibit a resident falconer from legally obtaining from outside the state, a raptor species listed by the state as threatened or endangered, providing the falconer complies with the requirements of the state from which the raptor species is acquired.
j) An electronic migratory bird acquisition and disposition report, form 3-186A, shall be completed and submitted directly to the Service (and state?) within 30 days of acquisition, loss (due to escape, release, theft or death) or re-banding (due to loss or illegibility of previously attached band).
k) Raptors marked with falconry bands or carrying falconry equipment may be recaptured at any time.
l) Complete records of information required in the migratory bird acquisition and disposition reports of all raptors acquired, transferred, lost or released shall be maintained by each licensee for a period of five years.
m) Each falconer shall purchase, receive, sell, barter, or transfer raptors only in compliance with all applicable federal regulations.
n) Purchase – No person, other than a person in possession of a valid Raptor Propagation permit issued by the Service or a valid state falconry license, may purchase or acquire by barter any captive bred raptor for falconry purposes.
o) Captive-bred raptors of any species may be used by falconers, except as prohibited under the federal and state laws and regulations.
p) Raptors may be trapped by falconers for depredating purposes and may be used for falconry or released at another location within the state.
q) A nonresident falconer may acquire a raptor from the wild in this state so long as: i) he or she possesses a current falconry license issued by his or her home state; ii) the license allows for capture of raptors from the wild in the home state; and iii) the home state provides similar reciprocal trapping privileges for falconers who are residents of this state.
r) Nonresidents shall provide advance notice to the Department of all raptor trapping activities and shall comply with all laws and regulations covering such activities in this state.
s) Raptors may be captured only using traps or nets that are humane in their operation and use. Traps of such construction as Swedish goshawk traps must be attended regularly at least at eight ( hour intervals. All other trapping devices must be constantly attended while in use.
t) Rehabilitated raptors, or raptors taken or held under special purpose federal permits, may be transferred to falconers for use in falconry or to complete the rehabilitation and release; and rehabilitated and released raptors shall not be counted against the take or possession restrictions placed on falconers.

Other provisions. A major portion(almost half) of this document was deleted to fit on this site.





17. Extended seasons for all game species should spread across a period of at a minimum from August first to April 15th with consideration of federal restrictions.
18. Falconry and falconry raptors should be covered under wildlife code and regulations and excluded from humane animal laws.
19. Allow the taking and hazing of nuisance black birds and other species during nuisance times. Ohio has such a provision.
20. Right to retrieve raptor and game on private property with a statutory anti-litigation clause to protect property owner (research Iowa law).
21. Before one can acquire an eyass they must be tutored under another who has had eyass experience.
22. Pick the best statutes from WI, IN, and IL for fashioning a law which clarifies ownership of captive wildlife.

.
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  #13  
Old 09-08-2008, 03:14 AM
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Jack Jack is offline
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

A good many years ago we had a guy here pass the test and was awarded a general class permit. That is as high as it goes. You still have to take and pass the test. He had pictures and he had signed and noterized statements from known falconers that stated that he had in the past flown falcons. So if you can prove by showing them pictures and having someone write letters of recommendation and having them legalized and noterized, you should not have a problem as long as you can pass the test. That will not be a problem either if you simply study the guide.

Jack
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  #14  
Old 09-08-2008, 04:52 AM
SharpTail SharpTail is offline
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

My wife went from 0 to master just by aceing the test.
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  #15  
Old 10-08-2008, 04:32 AM
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

A lot of people ace the test, but according to what the P&WD General is as high as they will start you.

Jack
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  #16  
Old 13-08-2008, 05:06 PM
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Isaac Isaac is offline
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

I recently moved back to the States after flying birds in Japan for 3 years. Prior to my experience in Japan I had been licensed in the States for 4 years as well. My state (Colorado) would not accept any foreign documentation unless it was government issued. Since Japan does not have a licensing system the best I could do was letters of reference from people I flew with in Japan along with pics, video, etc. The State would not accept any of it. So I tried to contact the last state I had been licensed in (Utah) and they had lost any record of me being a falconer there DESPITE having band numbers for the birds I'd flown with no names attached...

Anyway, I had 17 pages of "unofficial" documentation. A letter from my former sponsor in the States, emails from the Utah Fish and Game saying they'd recieved my paperwork (that they have now lost), a federal permit number still on file with the Feds, a letter from the president of the Japanese club where I flew, numerous pictures of me handling birds from my time both in the States and in Japan, and video as well but NONE OF IT MATTERED. Despite 7 years of experience, having flown 3 RT's, a sparrowhawk, 2 Harris hawks, a European kestrel and training a praire falcon...I should be getting my apprentice license sometime this week.

If you're moving to the States, DO NOT move to Colorado. Other states my be more understanding.
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  #17  
Old 13-08-2008, 09:25 PM
Falconry Equipment International Falconry Equipment International is offline
Julian Stevens
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedtailNut View Post
Copies of Schedule 4 certificate showing you have kept recognized BOP species help with the official status, along with affidavit's from people who can show some understanding of BOP keeping I.E. recognized breeders, Falconry Club Chairman, Commercial course givers All of whom should be able to state as to the potential apprentices ability and suitability all help when approaching F&G and state regulators with an application, being able to sit and pass the apprentice test would be a prerequisite. Backing from USA based falconers willing to act as sponsors or just to attest to your ability knowledge and standing over the years should all be gathered before you make a application then it is up to the individual case officer to make a decision. If moving to the US you would also have to have your mews inspected if just visiting all of the above would help..

one or two Brits have done this and I helped one US citizen with proof of competence when they moved back home..
I will add my twopenny worth , but bear in mind I am talking about the American continent, not Just the US as I moved to Canada last year. I have over 40 years experience and some letters of reference from some of the most highly rgarded falconers both in The UK and Europe. I have also had many apprentices , ran a successful falconry course scheme and falconry experience business for nearly 15 years.
I have flown shortwings for 28 seasons and longwings for 31 seasons(obviously therefore felw shortwings and longwings during the same season fro several years).
I applied last season to Serm ( our wildlife dept) for a falconry licence last year to be told that needed all sorts of extra paperwork and that I may have to apply as an apprentice Eventually both presdent and Secretary of our provincial association both wrote letters backing me as a regular member( the highest standing in our provincial regs, Incidentally our club is the oldest in the US continent being incorporated in 1956) . However the regs have taken a quantum leap in the right direction in the last year but things certainly seem to be fairly similar to Isaac's experiences
Sadly Therefore , RedtailNut I think you may have been given unrelaible information. Not meaning to be confrontary here just trying to help
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  #18  
Old 17-08-2008, 08:47 PM
RedtailNut RedtailNut is offline
Mike
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Default Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falconry Equipment International View Post
I will add my twopenny worth , but bear in mind I am talking about the American continent, not Just the US as I moved to Canada last year. I have over 40 years experience and some letters of reference from some of the most highly rgarded falconers both in The UK and Europe. I have also had many apprentices , ran a successful falconry course scheme and falconry experience business for nearly 15 years.
I have flown shortwings for 28 seasons and longwings for 31 seasons(obviously therefore felw shortwings and longwings during the same season fro several years).
I applied last season to Serm ( our wildlife dept) for a falconry licence last year to be told that needed all sorts of extra paperwork and that I may have to apply as an apprentice Eventually both presdent and Secretary of our provincial association both wrote letters backing me as a regular member( the highest standing in our provincial regs, Incidentally our club is the oldest in the US continent being incorporated in 1956) . However the regs have taken a quantum leap in the right direction in the last year but things certainly seem to be fairly similar to Isaac's experiences
Sadly Therefore , RedtailNut I think you may have been given unrelaible information. Not meaning to be confrontary here just trying to help
As I said it appears to be up your individual case officer My info is based on personal experience where a US citizen gained knowledge in the UK that was accepted back in the USA He is now a licensed falconer

Regards,
Mike
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  #19  
Old 18-08-2008, 05:46 PM
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Greg Greg is offline
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Cool Re: Master , general , Falconry Apprenticeship

Just about right there Jack!
I hold a general californian licence. I had to fly to CA to take the test and like all US citizens I had to have a registered mews before they would issue a licence. This can be the mews of another falconer in the state. Even with almost 40yrs documented experience references from clubs and copies of licences to take wild hawks and falcons in the UK they only gave me a general licence. If you don't live there all the time a general is quite sufficient.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack View Post
A good many years ago we had a guy here pass the test and was awarded a general class permit. That is as high as it goes. You still have to take and pass the test. He had pictures and he had signed and noterized statements from known falconers that stated that he had in the past flown falcons. So if you can prove by showing them pictures and having someone write letters of recommendation and having them legalized and noterized, you should not have a problem as long as you can pass the test. That will not be a problem either if you simply study the guide.

Jack
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