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  #71  
Old 22-06-2017, 03:47 PM
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DaveyMc DaveyMc is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

What you doing up this end mate.
Anything nice?
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  #72  
Old 22-06-2017, 03:48 PM
T0M T0M is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by XiaTeal'c View Post
What is a X rated ideology advocate Mickey?
😂😂
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  #73  
Old 22-06-2017, 04:05 PM
T0M T0M is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by Shaun Bannister View Post
i can have a conversation on facebook with like minded and experienced folk whom i know, if they're idiots i can just block them ,hence why i try to avoid such matters on here when possible ,gimme a shout on fb so i know who you are
Maybe in the beginning I would have taken you up on your offer but I think it will be a pointless exercise as we are not like minded.


So how about answering my question, would the plate in your opinion interfere with brooding?
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  #74  
Old 22-06-2017, 04:14 PM
XiaTeal'c XiaTeal'c is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by T0M View Post
I do Mickey I'd like to know what one is and you being one seems you'd be the best person to ask.
Tom

I have no idea, it was Kathy who added that when she set up this account. Inwould suggest you google it if you are so interested...

So what is your opinion on the plate interfering with brooding eggs, or have you not got one?
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  #75  
Old 22-06-2017, 04:44 PM
T0M T0M is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by XiaTeal'c View Post
Tom

I have no idea, it was Kathy who added that when she set up this account. Inwould suggest you google it if you are so interested...

So what is your opinion on the plate interfering with brooding eggs, or have you not got one?
Haha, that is actually quite funny and no I'm really not interested in the slightest. I just thought you had done it and you was some guy who thought it was clever to call them self one. I was thinking of calling myself a xylophone Pythagoras to P you off. Anyway now I know the whole story I see you in a different light. You can see what im saying...a grown man calling himself one of them must be a right ...you get my drift.

As for the plate I hear what you are saying. If the bird manoeuvres herself carefully then yes she could easily sit on them to brood. As for it interfering then also yes, like I said it could possibly crack the eggs but it is something that does not need discussing as it did not happen
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  #76  
Old 22-06-2017, 05:39 PM
Shaun Bannister Shaun Bannister is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by T0M View Post
Maybe in the beginning I would have taken you up on your offer but I think it will be a pointless exercise as we are not like minded.


So how about answering my question, would the plate in your opinion interfere with brooding?
lol tom you really have misunderstood me ,i meant give me a heads up on fb so i can block you ,sadly i dont have that option on here ,hence why i try not to engage ,remember the top of the tree thing ? you need to go find yourself one mate
Bye
__________________
what goes around ,comes around
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  #77  
Old 22-06-2017, 06:44 PM
XiaTeal'c XiaTeal'c is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by DaveyMc View Post
What you doing up this end mate.
Anything nice?
Working on a contract up there, mainly working from home so just up for a day or two each week.
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  #78  
Old 22-06-2017, 06:45 PM
T0M T0M is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by Shaun Bannister View Post
lol tom you really have misunderstood me ,i meant give me a heads up on fb so i can block you ,sadly i dont have that option on here ,hence why i try not to engage ,remember the top of the tree thing ? you need to go find yourself one mate
bye
Aw shucks did I really fall for that?🙃

Little monkeys live in the tops of trees Shaun little monkeys 🙉🙈
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  #79  
Old 29-07-2017, 10:51 PM
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BarneyAndMonty BarneyAndMonty is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Attached the reply I've finally received from the BBC. Pretty much as expected really, what do you make of it?

Reference CAS-4407776-VFV1TQ

Thank you for your comments to BBC Springwatch and we are so sorry that you have been disturbed by the satellite tagging of the Salisbury Cathedral peregrine falcon. The welfare of this beautiful bird is something everyone on Springwatch takes really seriously and we took extra precautions to minimise any risk to both peregrines during their breeding season.

The tag that has been fitted is a special lightweight one, designed by the BTO and fitted by a raptor specialist under licence. There is a breastplate for comfort and it has been developed after years of tagging research by both the BTO and RSPB. The tagging also took place in a very specific window of time, agreed by the BTO and RSPB.

The decision to tag the female peregrine was taken as part of an ongoing research project to gain more scientific understanding of young peregrines in the West of England, particularly those hatched in urban locations. Knowing how far these birds travel when they leave their nests can help in important areas of conservation.

However may we take this opportunity to stress again that we would never support any tagging projects like these without working under licence and with the correct professionals. We do appreciate there is a risk with any tagging project, but everything is done to minimise those risks as much as possible – and the hope is that the knowledge that wildlife organisations such as the BTO and RSPB gain from these projects outweighs those risks.

We do appreciate your feedback on this issue and as such I have sent your complaint directly to senior management as well as the programme’s production team via our Audience Feedback Report. This report is among the most widely read sources of feedback in the BBC and can help inform decisions about future programming.

Once again thank you for taking the time to contact us.

Best regards,

BBC Audience Services on behalf of Springwatch.



Kind regards



Craig Osborne

BBC Complaints Team
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  #80  
Old 30-07-2017, 11:39 AM
PaulUsHilarius PaulUsHilarius is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

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Originally Posted by PaulUsHilarius View Post
My guess is that the plastic plate was only used for the fitting of the harness. I read somewhere that they used hemp thread to secure it, with the idea that this would rot in time and the harness would fall off. The only way this would happen cleanly, and not just on one side, is if the four ends of the tape were secured by a single bit of thread at what would be the 'crossover point' on a normal falconry harness. In the video the straps in the plastic would be too short to feed through to the back of the bird. The white plastic could have been used to get all straps in place and then would have provided protection from a needle while they were stitched. Then it could have been cut off. That would not be a bad method as long as the correct tightness/looseness can be achieved.

But the timing of the trapping and the length of time she was off the eggs is just appalling and unforgivable. It may well have caused the failure of some or all of the other four eggs. The reason given tor the fitting of the tracker was so that the hunting habits of the falcon feeding the young could be studied. With four or five chicks to feed the pair would indeed be busy, but with just the single chick the tiercel can probably feed everybody. I suppose data will be acquired about the habits of a female peregrine when she has only one chick.
I stand by my theory that the plastic plate was just used for fitting the harness, and removed before the bird was released. A google search I just found this, where a bit of paper is used instead of plastic:

Http://www.ospreytrax.com/Papers/Harness_paper.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarneyAndMonty View Post
Attached the reply I've finally received from the BBC. Pretty much as expected really, what do you make of it?

Reference CAS-4407776-VFV1TQ

Thank you for your comments to BBC Springwatch and we are so sorry that you have been disturbed by the satellite tagging of the Salisbury Cathedral peregrine falcon. The welfare of this beautiful bird is something everyone on Springwatch takes really seriously and we took extra precautions to minimise any risk to both peregrines during their breeding season.

The tag that has been fitted is a special lightweight one, designed by the BTO and fitted by a raptor specialist under licence. There is a breastplate for comfort and it has been developed after years of tagging research by both the BTO and RSPB. The tagging also took place in a very specific window of time, agreed by the BTO and RSPB.

The decision to tag the female peregrine was taken as part of an ongoing research project to gain more scientific understanding of young peregrines in the West of England, particularly those hatched in urban locations. Knowing how far these birds travel when they leave their nests can help in important areas of conservation.

However may we take this opportunity to stress again that we would never support any tagging projects like these without working under licence and with the correct professionals. We do appreciate there is a risk with any tagging project, but everything is done to minimise those risks as much as possible – and the hope is that the knowledge that wildlife organisations such as the BTO and RSPB gain from these projects outweighs those risks.

We do appreciate your feedback on this issue and as such I have sent your complaint directly to senior management as well as the programme’s production team via our Audience Feedback Report. This report is among the most widely read sources of feedback in the BBC and can help inform decisions about future programming.

Once again thank you for taking the time to contact us.

Best regards,

BBC Audience Services on behalf of Springwatch.



Kind regards



Craig Osborne

BBC Complaints Team
You have been fobbed off with a pathetic answer. This is just nonsense:
"There is a breastplate for comfort and it has been developed after years of tagging research by both the BTO and RSPB."

Has there been an answer anywhere about the fertility or stage of development of chicks in the unhatched eggs?
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