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  #81  
Old 30-07-2017, 10:04 PM
Derek Canning's Avatar
Derek Canning Derek Canning is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulUsHilarius View Post
I stand by my theory that the plastic plate was just used for fitting the harness, and removed before the bird was released. A google search I just found this, where a bit of paper is used instead of plastic:

Http://www.ospreytrax.com/Papers/Harness_paper.pdf

You have been fobbed off with a pathetic answer. This is just nonsense:
"There is a breastplate for comfort and it has been developed after years of tagging research by both the BTO and RSPB."

Has there been an answer anywhere about the fertility or stage of development of chicks in the unhatched eggs?
We may never find the truth about why the eggs failed.
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  #82  
Old 30-07-2017, 11:05 PM
T0M T0M is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

That reply is probably from a pr operative who hasn't got a clue about what is going on. The likes of Marshall and microsensory will be putting more effort into designing a lightweight transmitter.
Was the question asked about the eggs?
Why have they not updated everyone on spring watch as to what happened to them?
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  #83  
Old 31-07-2017, 10:07 AM
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BradazTheFalconer BradazTheFalconer is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by T0M View Post
That reply is probably from a pr operative who hasn't got a clue about what is going on. The likes of Marshall and microsensory will be putting more effort into designing a lightweight transmitter.
Was the question asked about the eggs?
Why have they not updated everyone on spring watch as to what happened to them?
It certainly doesn't look good on their part when they miss out an answer/update. Especially as they said that they would "share the results as to why the eggs failed to hatch" on an episode in the series just gone. I'm not going to make guesses as to why they didn't hatch as I don't know enough to although clearly something went wrong whether it be down to their actions or nature's.

Regards,

Bradley
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  #84  
Old 31-07-2017, 08:34 PM
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BarneyAndMonty BarneyAndMonty is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulUsHilarius View Post
I stand by my theory that the plastic plate was just used for fitting the harness, and removed before the bird was released. A google search I just found this, where a bit of paper is used instead of plastic:

http://www.ospreytrax.com/Papers/Harness_paper.pdf

You have been fobbed off with a pathetic answer. This is just nonsense:
"There is a breastplate for comfort and it has been developed after years of tagging research by both the BTO and RSPB."

Has there been an answer anywhere about the fertility or stage of development of chicks in the unhatched eggs?
The egg questions were asked and ignored, as such it has been sent back asking them to try again...........

Quote:
Originally Posted by BradazTheFalconer View Post
It certainly doesn't look good on their part when they miss out an answer/update. Especially as they said that they would "share the results as to why the eggs failed to hatch" on an episode in the series just gone. I'm not going to make guesses as to why they didn't hatch as I don't know enough to although clearly something went wrong whether it be down to their actions or nature's.

Regards,

Bradley
Bradley, I have suggested they update their findings in Autumnwatch. How true that update, if it happens would be only time will tell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BradazTheFalconer View Post
It certainly doesn't look good on their part when they miss out an answer/update. Especially as they said that they would "share the results as to why the eggs failed to hatch" on an episode in the series just gone. I'm not going to make guesses as to why they didn't hatch as I don't know enough to although clearly something went wrong whether it be down to their actions or nature's.

Regards,

Bradley
Bradley, I have suggested they update their findings in Autumnwatch. How true that update, if it happens would be only time will tell.
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  #85  
Old 01-08-2017, 10:19 AM
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BradazTheFalconer BradazTheFalconer is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarneyAndMonty View Post

Bradley, I have suggested they update their findings in Autumnwatch. How true that update, if it happens would be only time will tell.
David,

That seems like a reasonable suggestion. I doubt we're not the only viewers wondering why that story got lost last series. I enjoy watching Springwatch but when people question what they're doing and they say they will update the viewers, it's to be expected they go through with it. Hopefully they will clear things up in Autumnwatch either way.

Regards,

Bradley
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  #86  
Old 03-10-2017, 05:38 PM
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BarneyAndMonty BarneyAndMonty is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

The latest email from the BBC

Reference CAS-4503974-JPR30R



Thank you for your e-mail. I am sorry if you felt your original email, highlighting concerns about the Salisbury Cathedral peregrines, was not fully answered. I will try to answer your specific questions as best I can, based upon the information I have.



May I start by saying that the whole remit of Springwatch, since its inception, has been to respect and celebrate the natural world. The last thing anyone involved with the series would want, is for anything to harm the animals we feature. Our aim is always to educate and inform our audiences so that they may understand the importance of protecting and nurturing our environment.



In regard to the peregrines, both Springwatch and our wildlife partners acted within the law and under the appropriate licences issued by the relevant Government agencies. Further we have had the benefit of ongoing expert advice and input throughout our coverage. The capture, ringing and satellite tagging was undertaken by experts under the appropriate licences and in conjunction with RSPB and the BTO.



Both male and female adult peregrines, and later the chicks, were ringed as part of the BTO registered colour-ringing project, which monitors the survival rates of many bird species and collects information about their movements. The satellite tag, attached to the female bird will, in addition to providing a fascinating insight to the life of this individual, inform scientific understanding of her movements in the wider landscape, which can be used to inform ongoing and future conservation efforts.



You have asked about the timing of the capture of both adult birds. The time was agreed in consultation with our wildlife partners, who are experts in this area and was the optimum period recommended for capture. The activity took place after the complete clutch of 5 eggs had been laid and incubation had commenced. This is an agreed practice as it ensures the parent birds are already committed to their eggs. The capture was carried out during the third week of incubation and is a method that has been successful on other occasions.



In the natural world the failure of eggs can be a common occurrence for many different reasons. Unfortunately, we do not know the exact cause of the failure and cannot conclude that this was in fact due to a single factor or event as one egg did hatch successfully. As discussed on the programme, when it became apparent the others were not going to produce live chicks the decision was taken to remove them and test their viability. Those tests did show they had fully formed embryos inside.



The Springwatch team and our wildlife partners were saddened by the failure of the eggs to hatch, and while we have speculated on possible causes, such as the irregular laying pattern, issues with non-incubation or a bacterial infection, we have been told it is not possible to identify a definitive cause as to why the remaining eggs did not hatch.



The only silver lining was that, because the peregrines had only one chick, it allowed the RSPB to introduce an orphaned peregrine to the nest, something that could not have happened if there had been a bigger brood. Both the surrogate and the natural chick bonded and thrived under the care of two very attentive parents. Autumnwatch is hoping to feature these birds when it returns in October.



I hope we have been able to answer your questions and let me reassure you that we, and our partners, have, and will, continue to work with the interests of wildlife as paramount in all our projects.



Best regards,

Rosemary Edwards

Executive Producer, Springwatch

It's been quite a while now but I don't recall the the full clutch being laid before the tag was fitted, I thought the tag appeared on the female after the
1st egg was laid. ? it was then a further 10 days whilst the remaining eggs were laid.

Quite interesting to see the other eggs all had fully developed embryo's in them. Surprising though no tests could be completed to identify the cause of embryo death.........or is that another cop out?

For me more questions to ask but what is the point, no admission of blame would ever be made!!!
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  #87  
Old 03-10-2017, 07:02 PM
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Derek Canning Derek Canning is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarneyAndMonty View Post
The latest email from the BBC

Reference CAS-4503974-JPR30R



Thank you for your e-mail. I am sorry if you felt your original email, highlighting concerns about the Salisbury Cathedral peregrines, was not fully answered. I will try to answer your specific questions as best I can, based upon the information I have.



May I start by saying that the whole remit of Springwatch, since its inception, has been to respect and celebrate the natural world. The last thing anyone involved with the series would want, is for anything to harm the animals we feature. Our aim is always to educate and inform our audiences so that they may understand the importance of protecting and nurturing our environment.



In regard to the peregrines, both Springwatch and our wildlife partners acted within the law and under the appropriate licences issued by the relevant Government agencies. Further we have had the benefit of ongoing expert advice and input throughout our coverage. The capture, ringing and satellite tagging was undertaken by experts under the appropriate licences and in conjunction with RSPB and the BTO.



Both male and female adult peregrines, and later the chicks, were ringed as part of the BTO registered colour-ringing project, which monitors the survival rates of many bird species and collects information about their movements. The satellite tag, attached to the female bird will, in addition to providing a fascinating insight to the life of this individual, inform scientific understanding of her movements in the wider landscape, which can be used to inform ongoing and future conservation efforts.



You have asked about the timing of the capture of both adult birds. The time was agreed in consultation with our wildlife partners, who are experts in this area and was the optimum period recommended for capture. The activity took place after the complete clutch of 5 eggs had been laid and incubation had commenced. This is an agreed practice as it ensures the parent birds are already committed to their eggs. The capture was carried out during the third week of incubation and is a method that has been successful on other occasions.



In the natural world the failure of eggs can be a common occurrence for many different reasons. Unfortunately, we do not know the exact cause of the failure and cannot conclude that this was in fact due to a single factor or event as one egg did hatch successfully. As discussed on the programme, when it became apparent the others were not going to produce live chicks the decision was taken to remove them and test their viability. Those tests did show they had fully formed embryos inside.



The Springwatch team and our wildlife partners were saddened by the failure of the eggs to hatch, and while we have speculated on possible causes, such as the irregular laying pattern, issues with non-incubation or a bacterial infection, we have been told it is not possible to identify a definitive cause as to why the remaining eggs did not hatch.



The only silver lining was that, because the peregrines had only one chick, it allowed the RSPB to introduce an orphaned peregrine to the nest, something that could not have happened if there had been a bigger brood. Both the surrogate and the natural chick bonded and thrived under the care of two very attentive parents. Autumnwatch is hoping to feature these birds when it returns in October.



I hope we have been able to answer your questions and let me reassure you that we, and our partners, have, and will, continue to work with the interests of wildlife as paramount in all our projects.



Best regards,

Rosemary Edwards

Executive Producer, Springwatch

It's been quite a while now but I don't recall the the full clutch being laid before the tag was fitted, I thought the tag appeared on the female after the
1st egg was laid. ? it was then a further 10 days whilst the remaining eggs were laid.

Quite interesting to see the other eggs all had fully developed embryo's in them. Surprising though no tests could be completed to identify the cause of embryo death.........or is that another cop out?

For me more questions to ask but what is the point, no admission of blame would ever be made!!!
COVER UP EXPECTED AND CONFIRMED.
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  #88  
Old 03-10-2017, 09:17 PM
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BarneyAndMonty BarneyAndMonty is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Having re watched the show, the female was brooding the full clutch at the time she was tagged.......memory issues

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Lxdg3gz1oI

24.10 into the show is the peregrine slot.

30.50 the tagging

'Female returns to brood the eggs after an hour or so.'

To the breeders out there, do your females leave their eggs for an hour or so with about a week to go before hatch?
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  #89  
Old 03-10-2017, 09:45 PM
Derek Canning's Avatar
Derek Canning Derek Canning is offline
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarneyAndMonty View Post
Having re watched the show, the female was brooding the full clutch at the time she was tagged.......memory issues

Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Lxdg3gz1oI

24.10 into the show is the peregrine slot.

30.50 the tagging

'Female returns to brood the eggs after an hour or so.'

To the breeders out there, do your females leave their eggs for an hour or so with about a week to go before hatch?
'OR SO' IS THE BIG QUESTION.
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  #90  
Old 05-10-2017, 09:36 PM
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SugezWolf SugezWolf is offline
Gerry Plant
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Default Re: Trapping a breeding pair of peregrine falcons

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Canning View Post
COVER UP EXPECTED AND CONFIRMED.
Agreed Derek - if that had happened in my area I would be investigating a disturbance offence!

Gerry xx
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