Falconry Forum (IFF)


Go Back   Falconry Forum (IFF) > BIRD OF PREY TALK > Broadwings - Buteo > Harris Hawks

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 21-01-2016, 04:18 PM
Goshawk357 Goshawk357 is offline
Passage
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: liverpool
Posts: 1,148
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Red12 View Post
Harris and Buzzard do cross breed. All feral Harris hawks need to be controlled.
Roy, why don't you pop down to Croxteth Park, and control this harris hawk, what I see all the time, ile tell you were I all ways see it
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 21-01-2016, 11:19 PM
MitchellBrad's Avatar
MitchellBrad MitchellBrad is offline
An old hand on here!
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,476
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

When it comes to HH’s I know little about trained ones, in 50 years of falconry I’ve never so much as had one on the fist. But I do know something about the wild ones after observing a breeding pair in the neighborhood and other pairs within a couple of miles of the house. I live in what one might call a “housing development” though it’s horse property with each occupant having a couple of acres. There is a lot of food available for HH’s and other predators (raptors, coyotes, reptiles and felines) from mice to cotton rats, pigeons, doves and up to cottontails. During the summer they can also eat lizards and snakes. The wild birds are resourceful and do well although the temperatures could go down to the teens F and sometimes colder overnight. I’ve seen HH’s sitting on chimneys on cold evenings and mornings. Of course these temps are the exception rather than the rule but at 4600’ elevation almost anything can happen. From what I’ve read several years ago a well known researcher suggested HH’s in populated areas were on the decline. That’s not true locally, they seem to be increasing their populations here. There is a pair at the local golf course which are successful in bringing off young. Of course this is still Arizona on the border with Mexico but we get snow, well over 20 inches of rain last year and our share of freezing temperatures at night. The HH nests I’ve found were all in evergreens too.

What I have learned is HH’s don’t often stick out. An excellent ornithologist told me he spent many days looking for the local pair until he saw 4 or 5 of them sitting on someone’s deck. I found the HH nest is on the golf course but never have seen an adult. The local pair can disappear for weeks at a time and unless I know where the nest is/was I often don’t see them. They had to move last year because a pair of horned owls took over their nest at the Korean Presbyterian church. I know of another pair out on Mescal road and see them once or twice a year. Interestingly enough the set where they shot the movie “Tombstone” is a few miles from where the pair hangs out. Other days I see HH’s all over locally. The other Sunday while coming home from church there were 6. It looks like another pair may be setting up house keeping a couple of miles from here, they were the first 2. The other 4 were the family going out hunting for rodents or rabbits. Only the adults hunt pigeons and often do it from a soar, I’ve never seen a youngster engaged in that endeavor.

We get a monsoon here in the summer, 2 months of rain. The HH’s survive that quite well probably due to the temperatures but we can get several days in a row of rain mixed with drizzle in the winter with temps sometimes into freezing at night. They survive that just fine too. I’ve not seen much snow here but the residents tell me they’ve seen several inches on the ground that lasted a few days.

What I’m trying to say is breeding HH’s often aren’t visible. I’d think in a place where they aren’t common it might be hard to find the birds nesting.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 22-01-2016, 01:06 AM
1Red12's Avatar
1Red12 1Red12 is offline
Roy - Official Site Sponsor
Passage
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Plymouth.Devon.
Posts: 1,852
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshawk357 View Post
Roy, why don't you pop down to Croxteth Park, and control this harris hawk, what I see all the time, ile tell you were I all ways see it
No probs mate , but to be serious I think there are just as many non reported birds out loose as there are reported birds.The area of the male HH and fem buzzard I was watching a few years ago, you wouldnt even dream of looking there for any BOP, just a small park surrounded by houses and main roads.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 22-01-2016, 09:52 AM
Dean York's Avatar
Dean York Dean York is offline
Haggard
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: bolton
Posts: 10,206
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Quote:
Originally Posted by SloeHawk View Post
Donna

As far as I am aware this is the only documented breeding pair of Harris hawks and you would think in 8 years that there would have been more reported.

When you look on the IBR website there are so many and these are just the ones reported.

Its actually a topic of conversation I have frequently had, I thought the Harris would get a foothold in the UK and be very common one day but as time goes on I am not convinced I am right with the counter argument that Harris Hawks are not built to survive a harsh UK winter.

As falconers we would all like to think that with the time spent training and hunting with our super fit Harris Hawks that they would make a very good living for themselves in the wild.

In reality very few ever reach their potential and they revert to been scavengers living on carrion and small mammals and never required to take on a hard flight on a rabbit.

How many times has your Harris hawk got wet in the field so much so that you have to dry it before putting it away, in a harsh winter that Harris in the same condition would not last very long at all.

I know many reading this that fly their Harris very hard and take over 100 head a season may scoff but I have one question which I struggle to answer.

The Harris Hawks of the southern United States and South America are not restricted in there movements by natural or unnatural obstacles and we are all aware that the Harris Hawk is one of the most adaptable, why are they restricted with the areas that they populate and not right across the USA and beyond?

ATB
Clive

Cracking post I agree entirely.

I hope your well Clive.
__________________
Too many cooks spoil the broth!!!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 22-01-2016, 07:02 PM
MitchellBrad's Avatar
MitchellBrad MitchellBrad is offline
An old hand on here!
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,476
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

This doesn't have much to do with HH's in the UK but I did get one from my back yard of the local HH family a few moments ago and though it might be interesting. One on the church and the rest perched on an agave.

The evergreen behind the church is the type of tree they use for nesting here. Unfortunately one of the nests they built overlooked someone's garage and was cut down. I suppose because the birds muted on everything and everyone underneath.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5937.jpg (91.6 KB, 226 views)
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 22-01-2016, 07:05 PM
I Love My Dog's Avatar
I Love My Dog I Love My Dog is online now
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wigan
Posts: 2,831
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Great pic lovely blue sky.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-02-2016, 11:37 PM
MitchellBrad's Avatar
MitchellBrad MitchellBrad is offline
An old hand on here!
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,476
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Spring must be in the air because the local pair of HHs have been harassing the larger local raptors. Ive never seen them chase a peregrine, sharp-shinned hawk, merlin or kestrel. Coopers hawks they chase with a vengeance, I think they fully intend on killing them if they can. When it comes to red-tails and harriers the HHs must see them as competition. Often I hear that god awful croaking HHs do before I see them. Upon looking up I usually see both adults in the air with the unfortunate raptor they intend on driving out making as much noise as they can. Red-tails appear to be more buoyant and simply go higher than the HHs but I have seen half hearted stoops on the red-tails by one or both HHs. The Harrier seems to be able to out maneuver its antagonist and will stoop the HH a few times but it doesnt really do them a lot of good because 2 HHs more than equal one harrier and soon its gone. After the hhs have accomplished what they set out to do they coast back to where they started.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hh5.jpg (52.9 KB, 169 views)
File Type: jpg hh4.jpg (43.6 KB, 172 views)
File Type: jpg hh3.jpg (32.8 KB, 169 views)
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-02-2016, 12:11 AM
MitchellBrad's Avatar
MitchellBrad MitchellBrad is offline
An old hand on here!
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,476
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

I suppose spring has sprung and love is in the air.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_6100.jpg (102.7 KB, 168 views)
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-02-2016, 10:11 AM
SloeHawk's Avatar
SloeHawk SloeHawk is offline
Clive Stancer
Passage
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Hull
Posts: 1,019
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Hi Brad

Some great photos

I have sent you a PM

ATB

Clive
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 17-04-2016, 11:04 PM
I Love My Dog's Avatar
I Love My Dog I Love My Dog is online now
Passage
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wigan
Posts: 2,831
Default Re: Harris hawks breeding in the wild

Does anyone know what happened with the harris and buzzard in Plymouth was the harris ever caught?
Donna
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
breeding, harris, hawks, wild

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.