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  #21  
Old 13-12-2011, 02:19 PM
Nebli Nebli is offline
Juan De Marcken
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

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  #22  
Old 13-12-2011, 02:29 PM
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Forrest Keefe
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

Hi Juan, I don't have any pics but I have heard over the years of "Blonde" Tundra birds being caught on our shores. Maybe someone from the states can submit a picture.
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  #23  
Old 13-12-2011, 03:00 PM
Nebli Nebli is offline
Juan De Marcken
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

I put the adress there ( an hungarian one)
Http://hoppare.com/vandorsolyom-feszek-eloben.html
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  #24  
Old 13-12-2011, 04:01 PM
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Trevor Oertel
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

I'm really enjoying this thread Juan, thank you.

Kind regards
Trev
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  #25  
Old 14-12-2011, 12:00 AM
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

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Originally Posted by Nebli View Post
This looks to me just like a calidus male
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  #26  
Old 14-12-2011, 08:14 AM
Nebli Nebli is offline
Juan De Marcken
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

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Originally Posted by Cassini View Post
this looks to me just like a calidus male
That's exactly what it is
Interesting to compare with tundrius, aren't they a bit darker on the back? or is it only a question of light ...


Head seem darker as well, so do the wings which seem more of one colour than the calidus , of course that's only from 2 individuals but any experienceon that anyone?

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Originally Posted by SANBoPC View Post
I'm really enjoying this thread Juan, thank you.

Kind regards
Trev
Thank you very much Trev , so do I enjoy yours , still got in my mind that wonderfull tale of yours with that calidus tircel and still feal frustrating at the way it all ended , really wish you could start it sometimes again .
kind regards
juan
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  #27  
Old 14-12-2011, 08:51 AM
Nebli Nebli is offline
Juan De Marcken
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

Iidentify this falcon :tundrius or cassini? I'd think it is a cassini, the images have been taken in brasil which is not supposed to have cassinis but that doesn't mean much it looks pretty much as some peruvian I've seen( in pictures)
If you open the page you will see on the right a short video of that hawk , could help better visualise him

Http://eptv.globo.com/terradagente/0...peregrino.aspx
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  #28  
Old 14-12-2011, 09:09 AM
Nebli Nebli is offline
Juan De Marcken
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

Town winning the corella battle

By Leah MacLennan

Posted Fri Apr 11, 2008 3:26pm AEST
Updated Fri Apr 11, 2008 5:00pm AEST

A peregrine falcon is the latest weapon in a war against the destruction caused by corellas in a South Australian town.

Across South Australia, the squawk of corellas can be a familiar summer sound.

In Strathalbyn, south of Adelaide, a noisy flock of about 2,000 corellas has been driving locals crazy.

But the noise is the least of the headaches - the birds wreaked havoc on parks and infrastructure.

David Mullins from the Alexandrina Council says they have been destroying trees, including a century-old Norfolk Island pine.

"They're not actually feeding off the trees, they're actually stripping the foliage from the trees just for fun and it creates a ring-barking effect that, you know, the trees slowly die," he said.

Agricultural teacher Ken Habner says the corellas are not confining their destructive ways to trees.

"[They] attack our irrigation hoses and put holes in them, attack electrical conduit and cause problems there, they foul in our troughs and on top of that there's just the noise and the pest value," he said.

The council tried many ways to drive the flock of out of Strathalbyn, including the use of high frequency sound, using a noisy clapper, and more controversial measures such as trapping and gassing.

Lucy fights the war

Bird handler Paul Willcock had another weapon in the war against the corellas.

He and Richard Naisbitt have used Lucy, a peregrine falcon, to get the birds out of town.

"What we're trying to do is train this flock to 2,000 corellas to understand that this area here is a no-go zone," he said.

At Mr Willcock's command, Lucy will scare the flock and chase it away.

It seems to have worked - very few corellas are now brave enough to return.

But the aim is not to kill the corellas, rather to retrain them.

These days they flock to the town's outskirts where a safety zone has been created.

They get food and water there, encouraging them to stay where they will cause less disturbance and destruction.

Before his work at Strathalbyn, Mr Willcock used the same technique to clear birds that were causing problems for aircraft at Edinburgh defence base in northern Adelaide.

He flocks of birds have also caused trouble at Port Willunga where almonds are grown and on the foreshore at Port Lincoln on Spencer Gulf in SA.

He says the use of falcons is a new strategy in Australia, but similar measures are often used overseas.

"In America it's quite practiced in big areas like airports - JFK in New York is protected by falcons," he said.

"In Europe they're using falcons, in Australia there'd be two or three people who've just started this program throughout the country."

Lucy came into Mr Willcock's care when she fell from a nest at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide.

He tried many ways to return her to her parents but when that did not work, he kept and trained the falcon.

Mr Willcock says Lucy has never learnt to kill.

"I've never given her live food, she doesn't know how to kill," he said.

"I've trained her actually just to chase birds, where I've used her now for areas such as this for bird deterrent.

"The peregrine falcon is the corella's main predator in life and also the wedge-tailed eagle that Richard's got."

Hummer 'thinks he's human'

Mr Willcock says an eagle named Hummer may be the next weapon in the fight against corellas.

"Hummer's background is he fell out of a nest as well and he was approximately two weeks old and had a broken leg," he said.

"We had the leg splinted and now he's five months old and we're going to give him an opportunity to fly.

"He'll never go back to the wild, he has no understanding of the wild, he's imprinted now as he thinks he's human."

While the falcon program has succeeded in getting the corellas out of Strathalbyn, it has not addressed the wider issue of overpopulation.

David Mullins says that does not seem to be improving.

"You see the problem getting worse and I'm not sure what the answer is at the end of the day," he said.

"We can keep doing our thing but it's an overall problem that somebody has to put their hand up one day and say 'Listen this is a huge problem around Australia and something's got to be done about it'."
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  #29  
Old 14-12-2011, 09:51 AM
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Trevor Oertel
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

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Originally Posted by Nebli View Post
thank you very much Trev , so do I enjoy yours , still got in my mind that wonderfull tale of yours with that calidus tircel and still feal frustrating at the way it all ended , really wish you could start it sometimes again . kind regards juan
Thanks Juan thats very kind of you.

As sad as it may sound I still miss "The Little Guy".

I'm currently training a recently imported Falcon and Tiercel from Ray Turner in the UK. Both are going great gun however I must be honest I've became paranoid about fences.

Obviously previously fences have always been of concern and one takes note of them however now I'm petrified. In truth its one of the down sides of high mounting hawks as by the time the falcon gets to the quarry not only is the falcon at top steed but so is the quarry which by now is a few hundred meters away.

Kindest regards
Trev

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebli View Post
Town winning the corella battle

He and Richard Naisbitt have used Lucy, a peregrine falcon, to get the birds out of town.
Good to see a former Zimbo falconer showing the Ozzie's how to do things. Well done Richard.

I see the article is a few years old (2008 ) however this is the sort of publicity I hope Australian falconers can capitalise on to get their Government to catch a wake-up.

Trevor
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  #30  
Old 14-12-2011, 11:53 AM
Marlon Marlon is offline
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Default Re: Wild Peregrine Facts and Images

Originally Posted by Cassini
this looks to me just like a calidus male

that's exactly what it is


Hello Nebli!
The pics from your calidus is not an male- it is an female!
The origine pics and the guy what takes it is covering in the book "Greifv÷gel und Falknerei 2011, ISBN 978-3-7888-1391-8
The female migrate always in the wintertime to SÚte in Fance. Every wintertime since 2005/2006 she stays on the same balkon from mr. Jean Michel Delaunay.
In the book there is an very interesting articel and pics about this female calidus!
Regards, MM:
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