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Old 23-07-2006, 07:22 PM
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Karl
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Default Emergency First Aid

I have been asked to start a post on emergency first aid, so if anyone has anything specific to ask or want to know then ask away or PM me.

Firstly - crop tubing. I think this is the most important aspect of first aid, and there shouldn't be any real excuse why someone can't perform this simple procedure. To start with visit your local veterinary surgery and ask if you can have some old syringes (5, 10 and 20ml) and some old drip tubing to use as your crop tube. I'd imagine most would let you have some used ones for nothing but if they are tight as a ducks arse may charge you a few quid. At the same time ask to buy either a sachet of lectade (or similar) and a tin of Hills A/D - both have long shelf lives so should last for a while (again, prob cost a pound or two). For shock I give Lectade only, but longer term mix in Hills A/D to a consistency so that it can be sucked up into the syringe - a dose of 40ml/kg can be given upto 3 times daily but for short term shock only use smaller amounts (10ml/kg) and gradually increase upto the 40ml/kg dose if doing ok. To administer crop tubed fluids have an assistant hold the bird vertically, hold the beak open and slide the tube down the side of the mouth into the crop. The opening to the wind pipe can be seen as a lemon/slit shaped hole at the base of the tongue (avoid this at all costs). The tube can often be felt sliding down the side of the neck and into the crop - administed the fluids slowly. Obviously if the bird shows signs of regurgitation or coughing stop administering imemdiately (or don't attempt if it is unconscious). A good way to practice is on a dead quail or similar, place the tube in and you should feel it in the crop region. This will help save more birds than any other treatment and will hopefully keep them alive until specialist advice can be sought.
Preparation is the key and there is no real excuse for not having the equipment (costs pennies) in your hawking box. An aletrnative would be to mix half a pint of warm water with 2 tablespoons of sugar and use some of this to mix with a meat based babies food.
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Old 23-07-2006, 07:32 PM
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Lee Gibbs (Admin)
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Will be watching this thread with interest...
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Old 23-07-2006, 09:33 PM
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Pitbull has asked about signs of lead poisoning and its treatment. Clinical signs related to this are fitting, lethargy, weaknes, anorexia and an apparent blindness - all pretty non specific and can be attributed to other heavy metals and toxins. One sign that is specific and fairly common with lead poisoning is leg weakness with the birds resting on their hocks and clenching one foot with the other. Green faeces is also quite common. I will not go into treatment as if you are suspicious get the bird to an avian vet asap.
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Old 24-07-2006, 09:28 AM
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Sprout with alot of begginers getting new birds entered soon especially during this hot weather and the chances of new birds being slightly dehydrated a warning on feeding up too much on first kills etc in relation to sour crop and its prevention please explain any pre vet action that can be taken if any would be benificial.
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Old 24-07-2006, 09:39 AM
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Thanks for this sprout its a great resource to have on the forum
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Old 24-07-2006, 09:48 AM
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Hiya Karl mate, great Idea for a thread, if it help even one person in a crisis then it's done it's job.

With your reference to crop tubing on the first post, do you or have you used critical care formula to crop tube a bird? and if so is it a better alternative to hills A/D or if available would you choose CCF everytime? What would be the pros and cons in your mind of each?

Cheers - Stu
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Old 24-07-2006, 04:36 PM
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This is a great thread please nkeep going sprout.
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Old 24-07-2006, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathFromAbove
Hiya Karl mate, great Idea for a thread, if it help even one person in a crisis then it's done it's job.

With your reference to crop tubing on the first post, do you or have you used critical care formula to crop tube a bird? and if so is it a better alternative to hills A/D or if available would you choose CCF everytime? What would be the pros and cons in your mind of each?

Cheers - Stu
Critical care is fine, our practice stocks Hills so I have most experience with that brand. Different companies produce different "critical care" formulas, I suppose the one with the highest calorific value is the most useful (Hills is fairly high) but remember the fluid is more important than the nutrition in an emergency. Also feed it warmed, tubing cold fluid/solution into the crop can further slow gastric motility and add to the problems.
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Old 24-07-2006, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardcore Hawker
Sprout with alot of begginers getting new birds entered soon especially during this hot weather and the chances of new birds being slightly dehydrated a warning on feeding up too much on first kills etc in relation to sour crop and its prevention please explain any pre vet action that can be taken if any would be benificial.
Hopefully a bird shouldn't be dehydrated as all should have regular access to baths. However as you mention a number of newly entered birds do succumb to sour crop. I believe the main reason for this is the bird is relatively low in condition due to manning and trying to enter the bird so has had minimal throughput in terms of food/casting etc. On the first kill people get carried away and allow the bird to gorge as a reward. The bird possibly being over keen will over gorge, affecting the ability of the crop to empty correctly. At the higher body temperature of the bird and in the hotter environmental temperature food will sour very quickly causing sour crop. The solution is to resist the urge to allow the bird to over crop itself on the kill. If the bird has food in the crop 4 hours later then keep a very close eye on it, it should have emptied by that time. If not fully empty a few hours later sour crop may be setting in, smell the breath - sour crop smells like rotten flesh, and the bird will go downhill very quickly. If confident crop tube a small amount of fluid to soften the contents and stimulate the crop again but get the bird to an avian vet asap. Some people recommend milking the crop contents out, which is fine but a big risk of inhalation pneumonia - I prefer to anaesthetise the bird, place an endotracheal tube to protect the airway then remove the contents, either by milking out or if the bird is particularly septic then remove by making an incision in the crop (which can be sutured a few days later). Cover the bird with broad spectrum anti-biotics.
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Old 24-07-2006, 09:41 PM
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Sprout I know it's difficult to describe a procedure with text only, but using a Harris as an example, how far approximately does a crop tube need to go into the crop, or doesn't it matter as long as it goes in. I'm going on a Neil forbes day course in a few weeks, so will hopefully get some hands on then, but have been wondering about crop tubing for a while, as it seems a very important issue.

Thanks
Simon
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